Online Journalism: Thursdays 2009

Icon

the class blog for Columbia College Chicago’s Online Journalism class: Thursday edition

the Site Community Presentation explained

Next week is our first of a few graded check-ins on your site. Driven by our focus on social media and community engagement, it is a check in that’s centered around the audience/community that you hope to reach with your site.

Next week we will have presentations and you will turn in a report. Your report and your presentation should encompass:

presentation & report

Who is the audience you’re targeting?
— what age/gender/etc are they?
— what do they do, both for a living and also for fun?
— what are their hopes/dreams?
— why are they interested in the things they’re interested in?
— where do they go? (both in real life and online)
— why are they a part of the community(ies) they are a part of?
— what will they gain by visiting your site?
Give three specific examples of people, complete with photo documentation. For your written report, write a short profile of each person.

Where is the community that already exists around your site’s topic?
— where do they go online?
— where do they go in the real world?
— what do they do when they’re there?
For both locations, please cite three specific examples of each (both virtual and real), explain the motivation your audience/community has in going to those places, their activities once they are there and what you can learn from these things to apply to your site. For the real-world place, please include photo documentation of your visit there: show us your community “in the wild”.

Who are the influencers in your space?
— identify three people who help to drive interest and people towards other sites, places, and concepts within your topic space
— talk with two of them (this can be a virtual conversation over Twitter, e-mail, or wherever)
— where do they go online? Why do they go there?
— what do they feel are the needs within your space?
— what leads them to recommend certain things?
— why do they believe they’re influencers?
In your report, be prepared to explain why you’ve identified these people as influencers.

Who are your competitors?
— give three specific examples and list their Google PageRank score
— how are you different?
— what are they doing right?
— what are they doing wrong?

What keywords are people searching within your space?
— how can those keywords influence your content?

Bring it all together
With all this information about your audience/community, explain how you will reach them and engage them with your site.
— three specific online examples
— two specific real-world ideas

Your report will be handed in, but please paste a copy in the comments section below. Be sure that every member of your team signs the report.

Slides

You will make a number of slides for this presentation. You will upload them to the photo-sharing site Flickr. Flicker will automatically make a slideshow of your photos, though it’ll help if you arrange them in a set so you can reorder them as you see fit. Your slides need to cover:

  1. Intro to your site with a one-sentence description
  2. Your audience defined, with photos
  3. Their community defined, with images of them in the locations you identified
  4. The influencers in your community
  5. Your competition
  6. The keywords around your space
  7. A slide for your conclusion

Your slides can contain as much information as you want (though remember: less is often more, you will be talking along with them), but need to cover these eight points. Link to this slideshow on the class blog.

If you don’t have a good image editor for making slides, check out Picnik, a web-based image editor that’s surprisingly robust (and free!).

Presentation specific notes

–Your group’s presentation should not last longer than 10 minutes, that will leave plenty of time for questions from the class and our panelists.
–Plan your presentation out in advance, and make sure everyone’s practiced it as well. Rambling doesn’t help anyone.
–Be prepared to answer questions with further detail about your site and your strategy.
–Finally, you will end your presentation with a brief look at the site. So, you know, you may want to have some stuff on it, huh?

Advertisements

Filed under: Uncategorized

8 Responses

  1. Molly Lynch says:

    F MAJOR

    Flickr URL: http://www.flickr.com/photos/35370619@N04/sets/72157615049069061/

    Megan Ferringer
    Eve Fuller
    Molly Lunch
    Brett Marlow
    Online Journalism
    March 12, 2009

    F Major Site Community Presentation

    TARGET AUDIENCE
    The audience our site is targeting are young adults, aged 18-25 who have a passion and interest in female musicians and lady-centric bands. They may be fans, listeners or musicians themselves looking to connect, network and/or learn about how to break into the local music scene or how to get a demo tape out.

    While not perusing our website, they’re working countless jobs in support of their passion and hobby whether it be at a coffee shop or teaching music lessons, whatever gets them to pay their rent and also gets them to their gigs or tickets to them, they’re going to do it. It’s hard times out there!

    Our audience hopes and dreams are to make it in the music scene in Chicago and expand from the local scene to venturing out to more states, gaining more recognition and breaking through a male-dominated local industry.

    Their interests are an extension of their passion, which is music: getting into it, making it, and helping others out.

    In real life, when they’re not playing shows, juggling work and touring their asses off, they hang out around the city meeting new people, rehearsing, going to shows and networking. Online, they’re into social media like MySpace and Facebook to promote their shows, or for those not musicians, they’re using these sites to find out about them. Maybe also music magazine websites.

    By visiting F Major, they will be connected with a plethora of other female musicians and talent in the Chicago area who are looking to connect, talk, swap stories, share instruments, or beginners can learn how to get themselves started with tips from those who have done it and experienced it, a valuable resource.

    Profiles

    Heather Perry, 22, Musician: As the frontwoman of her local band Heather Perry & the ____s, there have been many struggles for this up-and-comer from where to go to get my CD out, to booking shows, to getting out of the 312 and 773 to tour and get their music out, and also network with other bands, mostly female-driven.

    Emily W, 23, Guitarist: Being in a lady-centric band is good for Emily, but she’d like to connect with other people doing the same thing so they can share their experiences and knowledge of the local music scene. She suggests adding listings, swaps, and other postings for girls to get together and network and communicate in a community, as there’s not one presently.

    Lindsey Hemmer, 21, solo singer/songwriter: Lindsey has lived in Chicago for four years now. She has played several small shows around the city, mostly in cafes or at Columbia’s monthly open mic night, Acoustic Kitchen. She said she wishes that everything wasn’t so “word of mouth,” and that there was a reliable place for her to go so she could know when and where other acts where and how to contact other women who could help further her career.
    Rachel Kahn, 21, solo guitarist/singer: Rachel is a student at DePaul University, who tries to heavily involve herself in Chicago’s music scene. She ahs been playing guitar and singing at various open mics and underground Subway stations for the past three years she has been living in Chicago. Rachel is one of the females we talked to who believes that discussion should be a major implement of our site.
    COMMUNITY

    Where do they go online?
    Networking websites are the main draw for our community of emerging female musicians in Chicago. Sites like Twitter, Facebook and Myspace can not only be used to communicate between other female musicians, but they can also become a means to spread word about upcoming shows, events and album releases. Without these websites, there is no forum to contact/meet other musicians except for random run-ins at shows. Facebook and Myspace create a vast forum of communication, thus creating a more tight-knit, well-informed community of female musicians in Chicago. Other websites, namely Craigslist, create a large resource for musicians, informing them of venue openings, recording equipment and instruments.

    Where do they go in the real world?
    Smaller, though still well-known, venues throughout Chicago are the largest gathering places for our community. Park West, West Town School of Folk Music, Beat Kitchen and Bottom Lounge are only a few of the venues that frequently feature local, independent female musicians.

    What do they do when they’re there?
    Obviously, the greatest draw for many of these venues is to have a performance, though it’s not only limited to that. If not performing, many other female artists gather at these venues to connect with others and check out performances by other local artists, creating a support group for those trying to break into the music scene.

    INFLUENCERS

    1. Amy Schroeder, Founder of Venus Zine (a quarterly-published glossy magazine covering women in the music, fashion, film, culture and DIY scenes) and former editor-in-chief

    The reason I picked Amy to be an influencer for our site is because she is incredibly passionate about women’s issues, and especially women in the music scene. She has interviewed countless female musicians before their careers have taken off, making her a person who can clearly identify potential within a female artist.

    Amy also knows about the struggles female musicians face when they are just starting off in the business, because she has been covering it for 15 years. She started Venus in her college dorm room at Michigan State University and has been passionate ever since.

    Amy said that, in a perfect world, a magazine like Venus wouldn’t have to exist because women and men would be getting equal treatment. I thought this was a very powerful statement, since we also had the same idea when coming up with the site.

    2. Other people within our targeted community.

    This might sound a bit far-fetched, but we feel one of the unique things about our website is that it would be a place where the users can serve as influences to each other. There isn’t an online community like this that already exists. Every site user is valuable to our website.

    The main needs that exist for these people is that they want a place where they can connect with one another. For example, one of the girls I interviewed would like some sort of message board where users can post about various topics, shows, etc. We have also implemented a calendar feature, so it’s easier to see where and when female acts are happening within the city.

    These people are great influencers because they know first-hand exactly what they need out of a website.

    COMPETITORS
    http://www.FemMuse.com
    PageRank: 3/10

    FemMuse is a great site for networking. It prides itself on “helping each other out” which I think is also what our site strives for. FemMuse has a great list of resources which is also something we want to provide on our website. From recording studios, to clubs, to magazines, to photographers, this site gives detailed contact information for everything a LA based female musician would be interested in. I think this site works well and is successful because the woman who made it, Shedmistress Rynata, is an “award winning female lead guitarist.” Not to say that our site will not also have great networking tools and information, but I bet Shedmistress Rynata had a lot of connections in the music industry which has helped make her website a success. FemMuse is based out of LA, but it gives concert and show information all over the United States. Our site differs in the way that it will only give information on shows that are in the Chicagoland area. What the site seems to be lacking in is up to date news pieces. On the front page of the website it shows “News: January 2008.” Clearly the website needs to be updated.

    http://www.Mary4Music.com
    PageRank: 4/10

    Mary4Music is a site that focuses on females in music, women songwriters, female drummers, guitarists, and bands. What works for this site is that it really has a plethora of resources. There are A–Z listings of indie artists, female musicians, music news, musician resources for promotions, studios, and CD services, and a lot more. This site even has a place to buy music jewelry and instrument necklaces, or find out about charities. This site is used more as a resource for artists to put their website link on. I am not sure if our website will do the same and help promote other musicians by giving links to their personal WebPages, but I think that this is an interesting idea. Mary4Music also has a guestbook, which I think would be beneficial to our site. It would be a great way to see who is looking at our site, and also a way to learn about new musicians or help feature them on our site.

    http://www.girlmusicianonline.com
    PageRank: 0/10

    GMO is a female musician site that also has a lot of the same resources we would like to feature on our website. GMO has feature artists, reviews, music news, and posters and photos. This site features new artists but it also features information and pictures on “legendary rockers” like Janis Joplin. Something that GMO does well is that under “Artists and Sounds” you can look up artists and also hear audio from them. I think that is definitely something we would like to incorporate into our own website. Like the other sites mentioned, I think what this site doesn’t do well is how the website looks visually. Although these sites all have some great resources for female musicians, none of them look modern.
    KEYWORDS
    The keywords that people would be using to look up our website would be: female, musician, resources, Chicago, concerts, reviews, musician listings, instruments. Those keywords would influence our websites content by obviously being able to provide female musician resources in Chicago. I think that our site can appeal to either female musicians themselves, people who are looking for female musicians, and people who are already in the music industry and are maybe looking to find new female musicians out there.
    WRAPPING IT UP

    Based on the interviews we’ve done, we’ve come to the conclusion that there is a definite need for our specific site within the community we have define. We have identified several members of our target audience already who are avid members of social networking sites. These members use sites like Facebook, MySpace and Twitter to connect with one another and to promote themselves and their music.

    Our site would further utilize these tools by bringing them all together, thus creating a true “community” for our site.

    Rock on, girl!

  2. Kate Spethmann says:

    Flickr URL: http://www.flickr.com/photos/36270831@N03/show/

    Kate Spethmann, Lauren Wille, Jennifer Nunez, Jennie Fajman

    Healthy Budget Chi

    Audience:
    College students 18-25 both female and male. They either live off student loans/ family help or have part-time jobs. They frequently have house parties, go to concerts and quiet meeting/studying places like starbucks. They are always connected to friends via Facebook, Myspace, Twitter, texting and phone calls. They are somewhat addicted to the web and connecting to people.
Hope and dreams include graduating/finishing school, paying back student loans and getting a respectable job out of college. They are the “green” healthy generation that enjoys soy lattes and wishes they had the wallet to support a Whole Foods pantry.

    From what we understand, our audience (and most college students) are interested in the things they are interested in and do the things they do because they want to feel important in this world. (make their mark.) They enjoy themselves so that makes them happy.
 On any given day, these college kids may visit grubhub.com to order food, stop by for a laugh on collegehumor.com. Recipe.com and Cooks.com are places they will snoop around when they want to cook something, but they will certainly look at social sites like Facebook on a daily basis. They can be seen doing homework or talking with friends at Starbucks or Panera Bread. They like to go to parties and concerts on the weekends. Fastfood joints that get you a meal for under $5 are a common stop. But most of the time they are in class or studying in the library/computer labs.

    They are a part of the college community of Chicago. They are a part of this community because they go to school and the feeling of campus makes them that way. Each school has a different feel to it. By visiting our site, they will gain better eating habits, a fatter wallet and energy and stamina for the long school days.

    Brennan Peters, 22- Brennan is a smoker, but has recently found himself wanting to eat and be healthier. He is a Columbia College student and is majoring in film and video. He lives with his girlfriend, Amie Wagner…

    Amie Wagner, 22- Amie is a medical assistant and is subsequently very conscious of her health. Although, she is recently graduated and loan payments are somewhat draining her paychecks so her budget is limited.

    Mike Fischer, 21- A UIC student majoring in graphic design, Mike is also a closet cooking enthusiast. He rarely indulges in “nights out” but instead likes to cook his three meals a day. But, he still needs to live on his college budget (which currently is just a savings account since he is unemployed.)

    Where is the community that already exists around your site’s topic?
    Real world: parties, class, “out” (movies, bowling, bars, concerts, etc.)
    Online: e-mail, Facebook, school website

    Who are the influencers in your space?
    Damien Master, 25- He goes to his school website/e-mail (to keep up with university updates/events) grubhub.com (to find late night food or an easy meal when he’s feeling lazy) 190North.com (It’s a TV show/website that focuses on entertainment, food, trends and fashion in Chicago. He goes here to find new cool things to do and eat) cooks.com or recipes.com (since he is a culinary arts student, he’s always looking for ways to practice his skills in the kitchen)
    He definitely feels a need for video tutorials, archives and links to other networks. When it comes to cooking, especially if you’re inexperienced, Damien believes it’s always a good idea to have a video of how it’s done. Then if the meal doesn’t turn out right, they can always go back and watch the video to see what they missed. Plus, if you’re interested in food, you most likely enjoy watching people cook. Archives are important because you need documentation of everything old and everything new. Links to other sites and networks will not only provide more information for your users, but will show that you’re open to other ideas and advice, not just your own. 

    He believes he is an influence because he is studying what our website promotes. Not necessarily EASY meals, but he’s learning to be a full time chef. And although he promotes healthy eating, he has a hard time doing it himself, so maybe the site could benefit him as well. He would also be more than happy to share this site with his classmates, family and friends.

    Stephanie Flora Chau, 21- She goes to Facebook, Myspace, and her school web sites the most. She keeps updated on friends’ happenings, parties, gossip and of course, class info and email.
    She would like to see “super simple” meals, like 4 ingredients or less. She lives with her parents but doesn’t know much about cooking and would like to learn without having 50 different steps to follow–she doesn’t have a lot of experience.
    Stephanie believes she is an influencer because she is a potential user. She says our audience is full of people like her so what she needs and wants from our site is relevant.

    Competitors:
    Cooks.com 5/10, Recipe.com 4/10 and Allrecipes.com 7/10

    We are different because we are geared specifically for college students in Chicago and only post healthy recipes. You won’t find deep fried bananas on here!
    Our competitor sites have videos and pictures that help teach people how to cook dishes as well as recipe databases which is a major strength. A weakness of theirs, though, is that they don’t have an extremely tight target. Anyone who wants food goes there.

    Keywords:
    The words they are searching are: healthy meals, cheap meals, Chicago restaurants, recipes, etc. It will influence our content by giving us an idea of what our audience wants from our site: how-to videos, menu ideas, etc.

    Reaching out and wrapping up:
    We will reach our audience through Twitter, Facebook and posting to other food sites as well as with fliers in dorm and community kitchen areas, vending machine areas, and common areas throughout the campus.

  3. Michael Purgatorio says:

    Comedy Doctor
    Presentation Paper

    Comedy Doctor is a site where comics can go to not only learn the tools of the trade, but also interact with one another on a personal level.
    The site targets 18- to 26-year-olds, but also realizes younger and older audiences will take advantage of what we have to offer.
    Almost every comic wants to make stand-up a career, much like Frank Lee, Kevin Olsta and David Cosby (no relation to Bill) want to. All of the men interviewed take Dave Odd’s “Comedy Boot Camp” at Edge Comedy Club.

    Lee is a 26-year-old male who enjoys all forms of writing, starting with comedy. His hope is to have a full-time career “complete with an HBO special.”
    “I loved watching [stand-up] as a kid,” he said. “That probably drove me to spending a lot of my childhood becoming a very funny person.”
    Lee also mentioned he had a big ego and seemed enthusiastic about the website project.
    “Their just aren’t enough honest, specific, fact filled stories about being a comedian,” he said. “It would be nice when you’re starting to have real info from real comics about what shows they do, how much they make and what they have to put up with.
    He also would like to see stand-up taken seriously as an art form. He doesn’t like the content most other sites have, but visits places like Shecky Magazine and FunnyOrDie.com.
    “I’d love to see more people writing about stand-up as a serious artistic endeavor, in terms of practical craft or theoretical critical theory,” Lee said. “Of the few comedy sites out there, the articles tend to be unintelligent rants or just utterly pointless essays that feel forced; [they] are just a waste of time.”
    Currently he is working at Barista in the Ukranian village until his stand-up takes off. Other comics, much like Lee, have day jobs to sustain themselves, Olsta works two.
    “I have a clerical office job in the Loop and I’m a poker dealer for a charitable games organization,” he said. He wouldn’t say what the name of the latter company was.
    Olsta is 24 and said he’s somewhat of a comedy aficionado, which propelled him to eventually “get out there and do it.”
    He attends at least three open-mics a week and uses Comedians.ComedyCentral.com as one of the sites treats as a community. Cosby also uses that site, also known as Jokes.com, to study and learn from other comedians.
    Both Olsta and Cosby agree Comedy Doctor could be helpful to them by allowing other comics see their work and give constructive criticism about the routines.

    Dave Odd, who teaches these hopeful jokers at his Comedy Boot Camp, is one of the main influencers for the site. He’s been in comedy for little more than a decade and now helps teach aspiring funny people.
    He would like to see our site have video and contact listings for club owners and bookers, as well as the comedians. He said this along with open-mic reviews and listings would be helpful to beginners. One of his favorite sites starting out was ChuckleMonkey.com because of their regularly updated open-mic lists.

    (www.stagetimemag.com, 0/10, http://www.punchlinemagazine.com, 4/10, comedians.comedycentral.com, 7/10)
    Both Stagetimemag and Punchline focus on more established comedians while Comedy Doctor is for the up-and-comers of Chicago. They do not provide a clear cut process to establishing oneself as a comedic entertainer. Our site will be designed to specifically do that. Both sites tend to distract users by products, editorials, and social networking announcements.
    The competition is doing something right. They include some really informative interviews (Stagetimemag) on how fairly established comedians formulate their material, how/why certain venues are easier to entertain at, and what not to do during a routine.
    As for the negatives, (Punchline magazine) They have a variety of tabs but only a few of them contain links to articles/useful content. (Stagetimemag) This site veers off the comedy path by including an editorial news section completely unrelated to comedy – a formidable distraction.

    The keywords can dictate how we write our content. The more keywords there are in the first two paragraphs, the more Google hits the site will get resulting in more traffic flow. The beginning of each piece will most likely be really heavy with keywords that are relevant to our audience like comedy, comedian, stand-up and advice. They serve as kind of guidelines for what and how we write the piece.

    Conclusively, we will engage them by having multimedia featured on our site with videos of stand-up from both established and up-and-coming comedians. We will reach out to our audience through social networking sites like Facebook and Twitter for constant updates and events to jumpstart their career in comedy.

  4. John Lendman says:

    Site Community Presentation
    Volunteers – ChiCharity

    presentation & report:

    Who is the audience you’re targeting? (Ricky)
    — what age/gender/etc are they?

    Young men and women in their (early) 20s.

    — what do they do, both for a living and also for fun?

    Most are students, or just getting out of college trying to find a job. They like movies, music, partying; the typical things young people like to do.

    — what are their hopes/dreams?

    Most right now answered to quickly find a job in this rough economy, or to be able to hold onto the job they just started.

    — why are they interested in the things they’re interested in?

    From where they were raised, or how they were raised.

    — where do they go? (both in real life and online)

    Online, the Web sites most said were Amazon, CNN, ESPN, and celebrity news sites. Since we’re targeting people in the Lake View, Lincoln Park, and Wrigleyville neighborhoods of Chicago, most named area restaurants and bars.

    — why are they a part of the community(ies) they are a part of?

    Because of their interests and convenience to school/work.

    — what will they gain by visiting your site?

    Information and features on local volunteer organizations and opportunities narrowed down to a specific area.

    Give three specific examples of people, complete with photo documentation. For your written report, write a short profile of each person. (Andrea)

    Where is the community that already exists around your site’s topic? (Andrea)
    — where do they go online?

    Facebook
    Craigslist
    Youtube
    Gmail
    Chicagotribune
    BBC

    — where do they go in the real world?

    Art shows
    Coffee shops
    Thrift stores
    Free events

    — what do they do when they’re there?

    To hang out with friends
    To relax
    To get latest news (neighborhood)

    For both locations, please cite three specific examples of each (both virtual and real), explain the motivation your audience/community has in going to those places, their activities once they are there and what you can learn from these things to apply to your site. For the real-world place, please include photo documentation of your visit there: show us your community “in the wild”.

    Our site needs to be very timely, up to date, and incorporate diversified
    Stories on the subject of volunteerism (personal experience, etc.)

    The people in this community have similar almost exact interests as our target
    Audience. If we apply tactics such as youtube’s rating system or facebook’s
    Friend finder in terms of highlighting and finding volunteer jobs we can attract
    The community as well.

    Who are the influencers in your space? (Kasia)
    — identify three people who help to drive interest and people towards other sites, places, and concepts within your topic space:

    -ChicagoCares.org- For 18 years, Chicago Cares has been creating volunteer experiences for individuals, businesses and organizations to help combat much of Chicago community’s urgent needs. Since the beginning, Chicago Cares has created, managed, and led 20,000 community service projects, offered Chicagoans more than 275,000 volunteer opportunities, and dedicated 875,000 hours of service to the City of Chicago.

    -ChicagoVolunteer.net- For over 60 years, the Volunteer Center and HelpLink have connected people with volunteer opportunities and community resources throughout Metropolitan Chicago.

    -Chicagosfoodbank.org- Thanks to the help of approximately 14,000 volunteers—who provided more than 90,000 hours of volunteer time last year—the Food Depository is able to feed the hungry in our community more efficiently.

    In your report, be prepared to explain why you’ve identified these people as influencers.

    These three organizations are the greatest influencers within the community. The sites offer the most volunteer opportunities. They also have the most hits on line of inquirers.

    Who are your competitors? (John)
    — give three specific examples and list their Google PageRank score:

    1. Web Page URL: http://www.volunteermatch.org/

    The Page Rank: 8/10

    2. Web Page URL: http://www.chicagovolunteer.net/

    The Page Rank: 6/10

    3. Web Page URL: http://www.chicagocares.org

    The Page Rank: 5/10

    — how are you different?

    We list the opportunities that would appeal to teens and college students (so, no desk work like working phones) that requires little to no preliminary skills or training, and focus on the Northside neighborhoods of Chicago. Our site will also be very calendar-based, listing the opportunities by the day of the week, the time of day and hours needed. We would also try to list fun, unique and interesting opportunities (like the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum needs people to help maintain the animal habitats), and spotlight interesting organizations and volunteer news (marketed to idealistic youth).

    — what are they doing right?

    They list the contact information as well as (a little) information about the organization itself, what volunteers may be doing and what time they would be needed on certain days of the week. They also for the most part list the community being serviced (like homeless, senior, environmental, LGBT, etc.)

    — what are they doing wrong?

    The national sites are a little impersonal; they are just listing posts by the organizations like Craig’s List. The local sites list a lot of boring desk jobs and market too broad of an audience in too large of a location. The sites aren’t very flashy either and require too much searching for something worthwhile to do.

    What keywords are people searching within your space? (John)
    — how can those keywords influence your content?

    AdWords (approx. search volume Feb.)

    “volunteer chicago”: 2,400

    “volunteer opportunities chicago”: 590

    “volunteering Chicago” : 480

    “soup kitchen Chicago” : 390

    “homeless shelter Chicago” : 480

    “community service Chicago” : 390

    This could help when writing the description of the site. It also makes the idea of listing whether an opportunity is at a soup kitchen or homeless shelter or whatever high at the top in case someone’s just looking for a specific area of work.

    Bring it all together (all of us at the end)
    With all this information about your audience/community, explain how you will reach them and engage them with your site.

    — three specific online examples

    1. on Facebook: posting an Ad on Facebook or sending out mass messages leading to our site on, or create a “group” to create awareness for the site…

    2. Creating a Twitter account with links to our site and updates for a place to volunteer for the day

    3. Create an RSS feed that people can subscribe to to get the latest updates from our site.

    — two specific real-world ideas

    1. Post fliers in the area we are targeting

    2. Tell friends and family about the site, and ask them to pass the info on to others to raise awareness

    ________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
    Slides ( http://www.flickr.com/groups/chicharity/ ) I think you have to have a Flickr group yourself before you can upload photos (or slides)

    You will make a number of slides for this presentation. You will upload them to the photo-sharing site Flickr. Flicker will automatically make a slideshow of your photos, though it’ll help if you arrange them in a set so you can reorder them as you see fit. Your slides need to cover:

    1. Intro to your site with a one-sentence description (John)
    2. Your audience defined, with photos (collection of photos of people from Andrea)
    3. Their community defined, with images of them in the locations you identified (collection of photos of people from Andrea)
    4. The influencers in your community (Kasia can you find photos of the locations [of soup kitchins, shelters, etc.] online and turn it into a slide for the Flickr site?)
    5. Your competition (Ricky maybe screen shots of the sites listed here that would be our competition?)
    6. The keywords around your space (John)
    7. A slide for your conclusion (John)

    Your slides can contain as much information as you want (though remember: less is often more, you will be talking along with them), but need to cover these eight points. Link to this slideshow on the class blog.

    If you don’t have a good image editor for making slides, check out Picnik, a web-based image editor that’s surprisingly robust (and free!).

    Your report will be handed in, but please paste a copy in the comments section below. Be sure that every member of your team signs the report.

  5. John Lendman says:

    Site Community Presentation
    Volunteers – ChiCharity

    John Lendman
    Kasia Cichon
    Ricky O’Donnell
    Andrea Bacon

    presentation & report:

    Who is the audience you’re targeting? (Ricky)
    — what age/gender/etc are they?

    Young men and women in their (early) 20s.

    — what do they do, both for a living and also for fun?

    Most are students, or just getting out of college trying to find a job. They like movies, music, partying; the typical things young people like to do.

    — what are their hopes/dreams?

    Most right now answered to quickly find a job in this rough economy, or to be able to hold onto the job they just started.

    — why are they interested in the things they’re interested in?

    From where they were raised, or how they were raised.

    — where do they go? (both in real life and online)

    Online, the Web sites most said were Amazon, CNN, ESPN, and celebrity news sites. Since we’re targeting people in the Lake View, Lincoln Park, and Wrigleyville neighborhoods of Chicago, most named area restaurants and bars.

    — why are they a part of the community(ies) they are a part of?

    Because of their interests and convenience to school/work.

    — what will they gain by visiting your site?

    Information and features on local volunteer organizations and opportunities narrowed down to a specific area.

    Give three specific examples of people, complete with photo documentation. For your written report, write a short profile of each person. (Andrea)

    Where is the community that already exists around your site’s topic? (Andrea)
    — where do they go online?

    Facebook
    Craigslist
    Youtube
    Gmail
    Chicagotribune
    BBC

    — where do they go in the real world?

    Art shows
    Coffee shops
    Thrift stores
    Free events

    — what do they do when they’re there?

    To hang out with friends
    To relax
    To get latest news (neighborhood)

    For both locations, please cite three specific examples of each (both virtual and real), explain the motivation your audience/community has in going to those places, their activities once they are there and what you can learn from these things to apply to your site. For the real-world place, please include photo documentation of your visit there: show us your community “in the wild”.

    Our site needs to be very timely, up to date, and incorporate diversified
    Stories on the subject of volunteerism (personal experience, etc.)

    The people in this community have similar almost exact interests as our target
    Audience. If we apply tactics such as youtube’s rating system or facebook’s
    Friend finder in terms of highlighting and finding volunteer jobs we can attract
    The community as well.

    Who are the influencers in your space? (Kasia)
    — identify three people who help to drive interest and people towards other sites, places, and concepts within your topic space:

    -ChicagoCares.org- For 18 years, Chicago Cares has been creating volunteer experiences for individuals, businesses and organizations to help combat much of Chicago community’s urgent needs. Since the beginning, Chicago Cares has created, managed, and led 20,000 community service projects, offered Chicagoans more than 275,000 volunteer opportunities, and dedicated 875,000 hours of service to the City of Chicago.

    -ChicagoVolunteer.net- For over 60 years, the Volunteer Center and HelpLink have connected people with volunteer opportunities and community resources throughout Metropolitan Chicago.

    -Chicagosfoodbank.org- Thanks to the help of approximately 14,000 volunteers—who provided more than 90,000 hours of volunteer time last year—the Food Depository is able to feed the hungry in our community more efficiently.

    In your report, be prepared to explain why you’ve identified these people as influencers.

    These three organizations are the greatest influencers within the community. The sites offer the most volunteer opportunities. They also have the most hits on line of inquirers.

    Who are your competitors? (John)
    — give three specific examples and list their Google PageRank score:

    1. Web Page URL: http://www.volunteermatch.org/

    The Page Rank: 8/10

    2. Web Page URL: http://www.chicagovolunteer.net/

    The Page Rank: 6/10

    3. Web Page URL: http://www.chicagocares.org

    The Page Rank: 5/10

    — how are you different?

    We list the opportunities that would appeal to teens and college students (so, no desk work like working phones) that requires little to no preliminary skills or training, and focus on the Northside neighborhoods of Chicago. Our site will also be very calendar-based, listing the opportunities by the day of the week, the time of day and hours needed. We would also try to list fun, unique and interesting opportunities (like the Peggy Notebaert Nature Museum needs people to help maintain the animal habitats), and spotlight interesting organizations and volunteer news (marketed to idealistic youth).

    — what are they doing right?

    They list the contact information as well as (a little) information about the organization itself, what volunteers may be doing and what time they would be needed on certain days of the week. They also for the most part list the community being serviced (like homeless, senior, environmental, LGBT, etc.)

    — what are they doing wrong?

    The national sites are a little impersonal; they are just listing posts by the organizations like Craig’s List. The local sites list a lot of boring desk jobs and market too broad of an audience in too large of a location. The sites aren’t very flashy either and require too much searching for something worthwhile to do.

    What keywords are people searching within your space? (John)
    — how can those keywords influence your content?

    AdWords (approx. search volume Feb.)

    “volunteer chicago”: 2,400

    “volunteer opportunities chicago”: 590

    “volunteering Chicago” : 480

    “soup kitchen Chicago” : 390

    “homeless shelter Chicago” : 480

    “community service Chicago” : 390

    This could help when writing the description of the site. It also makes the idea of listing whether an opportunity is at a soup kitchen or homeless shelter or whatever high at the top in case someone’s just looking for a specific area of work.

    Bring it all together (all of us at the end)
    With all this information about your audience/community, explain how you will reach them and engage them with your site.

    — three specific online examples

    1. on Facebook: posting an Ad on Facebook or sending out mass messages leading to our site on, or create a “group” to create awareness for the site…

    2. Creating a Twitter account with links to our site and updates for a place to volunteer for the day

    3. Create an RSS feed that people can subscribe to to get the latest updates from our site.

    — two specific real-world ideas

    1. Post fliers in the area we are targeting

    2. Tell friends and family about the site, and ask them to pass the info on to others to raise awareness

  6. John Lendman says:

    ChiCharity slideshow:

  7. Mike Purgatorio says:

    Comedy Doctor Presentation

    TimBeardenSlide
  8. Eve Fuller says:

    http://www.twitter.com

    This is all that comes to mind when I hear media journalism. Don’t see how it can really help me as another journalist..yet!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

class documents

RSS what you’re saying: your blogs

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.

RSS online journalism news & opinion around the web

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.
%d bloggers like this: